Where to start? What kind of printer? I want to pioneer this in my country for indigents. Works in the medical field

General discussion related to getting started.
jrnozid
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2016 10:43 am

Where to start? What kind of printer? I want to pioneer this in my country for indigents. Works in the medical field

Postby jrnozid » Fri Jan 01, 2016 11:20 am

Hi! I've been fascinated with 3d printers for the past few years and I really wanted to buy one but so far found no use of it until now. I work in the medical field and most people around me does also. I also have a friend who has a dad who already has a position in the association of orthopedics in my country that's why this community got me really interested when I saw the video of 3d printing prosthetics on youtube. It got me really interested because I thought these prosthetics cost a lot but when I found out the cost it got me really thinking how we can give children and adults here the option of getting prosthetic arms and limbs for just a small amount since we're a third world country and people here can't afford high-cost prsthetics. So now here I am searching through the web how to start, so I'd appreciate if you guys can answer my question below, thanks :)

1.What is the best printer should I buy from this list considering that money is not an issue and that I am a fast learner on electronics and computer and I want a machine that doesn't get obsolete fast and wont need to change it in a few years( meaning , it can go on par with upcoming future technology of 3d printers). Also, a machine that can be used daily since we will be printing a lot of prostethics if the need arise. I find mysef in the ENTHUSIAST and DIY category but I'm having a hard time picking which is the best for prosthetic production
https://www.3dhubs.com/best-3d-printer-guide


2. Are all the blueprints for prosthetic creation here for free?

3. What other things should I consider before starting on this path?

4. Is it hard to learn the basic of 3d printing?

5. Any other information I should know?


Hopefully when I get started I can also help and donate on giving an arm and leg prpsthetics to others who can't afford

Peregrine Hawthorn
Posts: 64
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2015 5:49 am

Re: Where to start? What kind of printer? I want to pioneer this in my country for indigents. Works in the medical field

Postby Peregrine Hawthorn » Fri Jan 01, 2016 4:46 pm

Hello, jrnozid!

I, and many other users here, swear by the Ultimaker 2. It's a beautiful machine, makes great prints, breaks rarely, and is relatively easy to fix when it does. They also have a fantastic support team over at fbrc8. It's also large enough to print most any part you might need, and can do it in whatever material you need.

Many of them also come with an Olsson Block, which lets you swap hot ends for print resolutions from 0.8 mm to 0.25 mm (and a couple in between.) You literally just unscrew one and screw in the other, like a bottle cap.

The Ultimaker 2 makes this stuff super easy.

all the prosthetic files we use can be found on http://www.enablingthefuture.org . I recommend the more recent designs, as they are improvements on older designs. They are all available for free download, and most of them operate under some form or another of Open Source license.

That being said, most of the work is before and after the printing. It's not uncommon that someone needs an upper limb prosthetic and doesn't fit the basic models we have, and require modifications. Some knowledge in a basic 3D modeling software is invaluable. A couple free, open source, options include TinkerCAD (browser based, easy to learn, somewhat limited functionality) and Blender (installed program, very steep learning curve, can directly edit .stl files). This also allows you to customize prosthetics with designs or add-ons. Get creative. The best prosthetics tell you what kind of person it belongs to.

After printing, it's good practice to finish ABS parts with acetone vapor. A quick YouTube search can tell you all you need to know about that.

Keep in mind the finger closure. Do they close evenly? I prefer a grip that starts with the pinkie coming in first, with the other fingers following, ending with the thumb coming in last. How tight are the elastics? I recommend a hand without elastics like the Osprey, but if you decide to use one that does, are they too tight? Snappy action in the return may mean that the user can't close them at all, or if they can, the grip is so weak, it's no good.

Mostly, talk with your recipients. Figure out what they want from you, and what they want a prosthetic to be.

Welcome to the e-Nable family.

EDIT: Removed the duplicate topic in Technical Q&A
Heavy duty hand user, and co-designer of the Talon.

I break hands and then tell you how I did it.

jrnozid
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2016 10:43 am

Re: Where to start? What kind of printer? I want to pioneer this in my country for indigents. Works in the medical field

Postby jrnozid » Sat Jan 02, 2016 9:07 am

Peregrine Hawthorn wrote:Hello, jrnozid!

I, and many other users here, swear by the Ultimaker 2. It's a beautiful machine, makes great prints, breaks rarely, and is relatively easy to fix when it does. They also have a fantastic support team over at fbrc8. It's also large enough to print most any part you might need, and can do it in whatever material you need.

Many of them also come with an Olsson Block, which lets you swap hot ends for print resolutions from 0.8 mm to 0.25 mm (and a couple in between.) You literally just unscrew one and screw in the other, like a bottle cap.

The Ultimaker 2 makes this stuff super easy.

all the prosthetic files we use can be found on http://www.enablingthefuture.org . I recommend the more recent designs, as they are improvements on older designs. They are all available for free download, and most of them operate under some form or another of Open Source license.

That being said, most of the work is before and after the printing. It's not uncommon that someone needs an upper limb prosthetic and doesn't fit the basic models we have, and require modifications. Some knowledge in a basic 3D modeling software is invaluable. A couple free, open source, options include TinkerCAD (browser based, easy to learn, somewhat limited functionality) and Blender (installed program, very steep learning curve, can directly edit .stl files). This also allows you to customize prosthetics with designs or add-ons. Get creative. The best prosthetics tell you what kind of person it belongs to.

After printing, it's good practice to finish ABS parts with acetone vapor. A quick YouTube search can tell you all you need to know about that.

Keep in mind the finger closure. Do they close evenly? I prefer a grip that starts with the pinkie coming in first, with the other fingers following, ending with the thumb coming in last. How tight are the elastics? I recommend a hand without elastics like the Osprey, but if you decide to use one that does, are they too tight? Snappy action in the return may mean that the user can't close them at all, or if they can, the grip is so weak, it's no good.

Mostly, talk with your recipients. Figure out what they want from you, and what they want a prosthetic to be.

Welcome to the e-Nable family.

EDIT: Removed the duplicate topic in Technical Q&A



Hey man! Thanks for the quick and long response. I appreciate the input you have given and mostly answered my questions. I also had the idea the ultimaker 2 is one of the best because I saw it in other review site but what bothers me is why does it only rate 8.6 compared to the makergear M2 which is 9.1 from the link I have given above? What might be the difference between the two that makes the latter Get a higher ranking? Furthermore are all the files here backwards conpatible with all the printer here? I think it makes sense to buy the ultimaker 2 since it has a huge following but its already 2016, any chance the manufacturer produces the ultimaker 3 early this year? Again thank you and sorry for the double post :)

JaapJansen
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2016 9:29 pm

Re: Where to start? What kind of printer? I want to pioneer this in my country for indigents. Works in the medical field

Postby JaapJansen » Sat Jan 02, 2016 4:24 pm

jrnozid,

I totally agree with Peregrine. I have a Ultimaker 2 for exactly one year now and are very satisfied. It's a bit more expensive than other 3D printers but a good quality. I printed 1.5km of filament up till now. Power on for almost 4000 hours. Still no ploblems and no maintenance.
Recently I joined the e-nable community and printed a test hand without any problem.
What I advise is to use good quality filament. I used a cheap one and then I had problems printing. The same object with good quality: no problems.
I have no stocks in Ultimaker but I think this is the best choice. If money is no issue think of the Ultimaker 2 extended.
For designing objects I use OpenSCAD. For me that's easy since I am a programmer. But there are a lot of design programs, choose the one that fits you.

Have fun printing and welcome to the 3D world.

Succes Jaap :)

Peregrine Hawthorn
Posts: 64
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2015 5:49 am

Re: Where to start? What kind of printer? I want to pioneer this in my country for indigents. Works in the medical field

Postby Peregrine Hawthorn » Sat Jan 02, 2016 6:01 pm

It looks like the Ultimaker mostly lost out to the M2 due to lack of a duel extruder. It's s cool feature, but very few things actually require, or can even utilize, a dual extruder system.

And I'd second that bit about the Ultimaker 2 Extended. That little bit of print space would be nice, though it looks like the extension is for tall prints. Most hands are printed as wide prints, due to the grain of the plastic. Printing in a way that would take full advantage of that build hight would make weak parts.

It's worth noting that my experience using an Ultimaker involves pulling it out of the box, spending maybe 5 minutes leveling the bed, and then giving it a 60 hour print. It took it no issues, after a little hair spray on the glass print bed.
Heavy duty hand user, and co-designer of the Talon.

I break hands and then tell you how I did it.

jrnozid
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2016 10:43 am

Re: Where to start? What kind of printer? I want to pioneer this in my country for indigents. Works in the medical field

Postby jrnozid » Mon Jan 04, 2016 8:29 am

Double post sorry
Last edited by jrnozid on Mon Jan 04, 2016 8:39 am, edited 3 times in total.

jrnozid
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2016 10:43 am

Re: Where to start? What kind of printer? I want to pioneer this in my country for indigents. Works in the medical field

Postby jrnozid » Mon Jan 04, 2016 8:37 am

JaapJansen wrote:jrnozid,

I totally agree with Peregrine. I have a Ultimaker 2 for exactly one year now and are very satisfied. It's a bit more expensive than other 3D printers but a good quality. I printed 1.5km of filament up till now. Power on for almost 4000 hours. Still no ploblems and no maintenance.
Recently I joined the e-nable community and printed a test hand without any problem.
What I advise is to use good quality filament. I used a cheap one and then I had problems printing. The same object with good quality: no problems.
I have no stocks in Ultimaker but I think this is the best choice. If money is no issue think of the Ultimaker 2 extended.
For designing objects I use OpenSCAD. For me that's easy since I am a programmer. But there are a lot of design programs, choose the one that fits you.

Have fun printing and welcome to the 3D world.

Succes Jaap :)


Hey thanks for the reply, I have seen many good reviews between the two and might think of getting the UM2. Only problem now is what if they released the UM3 early this year then it would be such a waste since it would be the same price just like with any other products and their brand new model.

@peregrine,

So would you say that given the chance, you would choose UM2 again over the Makergear m2? and since Im starting to go with the UM2, same question above, do you have any idea when the ultimaker 3 might come out so I wont waste money on a older model?


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